Monarch migration

Parts of Monarch Migration 'A Great Mystery'

Parts of Monarch Migration 'A Great Mystery'


When monarch butterflies migrate over 2,000 miles to Mexico during the winter, they head to the same places within the fir forests each year. This fact may not sound impressive, but the monarchs who fly to Mexico may be fourth generation butterflies who have never seen the mountain forests and do not have any living ancestors to lead the way from experience.
 
Doug Taron, chief curator at Chicago Academy of Sciences’ Peggy Notebaert Nature Museum, will speak about the life cycle and migration of monarch butterflies at a West Cook Wild Ones monthly meeting from 2:30 to 4:30 p.m. on Sunday, May 26, at the Oak Park Public Library Maze Branch, 845 Gunderson Ave.

Happy News! Together We are Making a Difference for Monarchs!

Happy News! Together We are Making a Difference for Monarchs!

Oak Park resident, Gina Orlando, recently shared the happy news that she saw at least 10 monarchs at the same time on a patch of the swamp/rose milkweed at Mills Park.

“Their playfulness and beauty are a joy,” Orlando said. “It was wonderful to see!  And it's hopeful. They are coming back.”

Monarch Migration Events

Monarch Migration Events

In the fall, Monarch butterflies migrate much like birds, flying 1,000 to 3,000 miles from states such as Illinois to the Oyamel Fir Forests of Central Mexico. Their spring and fall migration is considered a phenomenon of nature because they travel farther than all tropical butterflies.

Three upcoming local events will teach more about these regal insects and offer us ways to help them.